Over the years, the Democratic back rooms have not much changed, but the newsrooms most certainly have.

In a fair minded Topeka Capital-Journal article, Allison Kite explores the problem of unemployment fraud in Kansas.

The article is blessedly free of the words used to challenge the very idea of voter fraud in Kansas. In one single Cap-J article on gubernatorial candidate Kris Kobach earlier this year, reporter Jonathan Shorman used these words to ridicule Kobach’s claims of voter fraud: “unsubstantiated,” “unsupported,” “without evidence,” “baseless,” “debunked,” “allegations,” “response error,” “assertions,” “fake claims,” “didn’t provide support,” “erosion of credibility,” “without any merit,” and “fantasies.”

In addition, Shorman’s article gives much more space to Kobach’s critics than to his supporters, including the last word from a former New Hampshire Attorney General, Republican Never-Trumper Tom Rath, “Let me as be unequivocal as possible, allegations of voter fraud in NH are baseless, without any merit-it’s shameful to spread these fantasies.”

It should be noted that the undercover journalists of James O’Keefe’s Project Veritas found it so pathetically easy to secure ballots in other people’s names in New Hampshire that the legislature changed its voting laws twice, once in 2012 and once 2016. The state now requires photo ID and in-state residency to vote.

By contrast, Allison Kite takes Kansas Secretary of Labor Lana Gordon at her word that there is a “significant amount of fraud in Kansas’ system.” Said Gordon, “It’s important to combat unemployment fraud in order to protect and preserve the integrity of the system and allow for the benefits to be there for the people that are lawfully entitled to them.”

Had Kobach said, “It’s important to combat voter fraud in order to protect and preserve the integrity of the system and allow for the ballots to be there for the people that are lawfully entitled to them,” the Cap-J would have–and has–screamed “racism” or “nativism” or some such slander.

In pursuit of balance, Kite asked a Democrat for a comment. Wichita Rep. Brandon Whipple said he would welcome a presentation on unemployment fraud. “We’d love to hear it and I’d love a chance to ask questions and dig deeper into this,” he told Kite.

The difference between voter fraud and unemployment fraud is that the Democratic Party has a near monopoly on the former. Today, the party has a near monopoly on America’s newsrooms, a dangerous combination.

This has not always been so. In the past, cities had newspapers with different perspectives. In 1972, for instance, the Republican leaning Chicago Tribune did a major undercover investigation of voter fraud in that city, one that a Democratic paper would never dare do. Focusing on just one primary election, the Tribune documented more than 1,000 incidences of fraud resulting in the indictment of 79 election workers, 30 of whom were found guilty.

Over the years, the Democratic back rooms have not much changed, but the newsrooms most certainly have.

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