The University of Missouri last week quietly removed from its library a poster honoring Margaret Sanger, the racist eugenicists credited with starting Planned Parenthood. A student pro-life group complained about the poster on Feb. 27 and took credit for its removal. In a rare turn of events for a university wallowing in the slightest micro aggressions, a library spokesperson quickly denied Sanger’s eugenic past had anything to do with the poster’s removal.

Shannon Cary said the poster was removed as part of a regular rotation of displays at Ellis Library. Officials removed posters of Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X when they removed Sanger’s portrait.

Mizzou Students for Life began circulating a petition on campus in January and submitted it to library officials in late February, KOMO-TV reported.

Library officials initially said they wouldn’t remove Sanger’s poster.

“There are a variety of posters and exhibits throughout the building that some people might find offensive,” Cary told KOMU. “The library will not remove this poster from its exhibit.”

University of Missouri library officials removed a poster of Margaret Sanger in Ellis Library. They said it wasn’t in response to a petition from a pro-life group seeking its removal.

It was gone last week, however, and Mizzou for Life students took credit. That prompted Mizzou libraries to issue another release refuting the pro-life group.

Mizzou has established itself as the national poster child for campus dysfunction. In a massive 2015 snowflake outbreak, a grad student staged a protest that resulted in the football team refusing to play unless the chancellor resigned. Protestors camped out on the quad for weeks, and former Mizzou journalism professor was caught on camera asking muscle to forcefully remove journalists. Despite establishing an exclusive program designed to heal racial injustices, the university can’t seem to get out of its own way.

Anna Haberdash, a chair of Mizzou Students for Life, told KOMU Sanger used birth control to target people she thought were defective.

“Her main goal was to create a cleaner race. She wrote that stuff in her books verbatim,” the Missouri junior told KOMU.

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