Wichita Eagle
In 1936, temperatures in western Kansas reached 121 degrees, a higher temperature than Phoenix has ever recorded. That year Kansas City experienced an incredible 53 days with temperatures above 100 degrees.

While the media fixates on warmer than average temperatures in Arizona, they have chosen not to notice as a major cooling front engulfs the eastern half of the United States. The 55-degree morning temperature on Monday in Kansas City has come within two degrees of the record set for the date in 1958. The projected high for Monday of 72 falls sixteen degrees below normal.

Kansas City did not experience its first 90-degree this year until June 5, nine days later than average. If current projections hold, the city will end the month with ten consecutive days below normal and no day in June higher than 94. Meanwhile the media focus not on the cooling in the eastern half of the country but on a hot spot in the southwest.

“Did Climate Change Ground Flights in Phoenix”–The Atlantic

“Phoenix heat, tropical storm Cindy show how climate change is a threat to our infrastructure”–Washington Post

“Will thirsty Phoenix survive climate change”–ASU Now

“Extreme Heat Waves Will Change How We Live. We’re Not Ready”–Time

Yes, Phoenix did a record hot day of 119 degrees on June 20. That was 14 degrees above normal, but on June 12, the high temperature in Phoenix was 92, 13 degrees below normal. As to the airplane issue, the grounding was limited to Bombardier CRJ airliners, which have a safety limit of 118 degrees. If they had to take off, they could have.

Kansas Citians of a certain age remember the summers of 1934 and 1936. 1934 was the hottest year on record in the United States, and it gave birth to the dust bowl. In the Midwest, 1936 was even worse. On August 4 of that year the temperature in Kansas City reached 113 degrees, a record that still stands. Temperatures in western Kansas reached 121 degrees, a higher temperature than Phoenix has ever recorded. That year Kansas City experienced an incredible 53 days with temperatures above 100 degrees.

At the time, of course, there was little, if any, air conditioning. For cooling, thousands of people slept in Swope and other city parks. There were also no ideologues in the nation’s weather stations.  Without human-CO2 caused climate change to blame, they had to seek real explanations for shifts in the weather, like, you know, stuff happens.

 

 

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