According to Disney World, the peak of the hurricane season is September 10th. Irma hit Disney World on September 10. The odds of a nine-day visit around September 10 being affected by a hurricane is about 40 percent.

Trending on Twitter Monday Morning, September 11, is an editorial from the New York Times titled, “Conspiracies, Corruption, and Climate.” Just as the media targeted Houston pastor Joel Osteen Alinsky-style for his alleged un-Chritian behavior after Hurricane Harvey hit Texas, the media are hitting Rush Limbaugh for his comments on Hurricane Irma.

Said Limbaugh last week, “There is a desire to advance this climate change agenda, and hurricanes are one of the fastest and best ways to do it.” This much is beyond debate as the New York Times editorial unwittingly proves. “In a way, we should be grateful to Limbaugh for at least raising the subject of climate change and its relationship to hurricanes,” writes the Times editors, “if only because it’s a topic the Trump administration is trying desperately to avoid.” The editors continue, “Thanks to Trump’s electoral victory, know-nothing, anti-science conservatives are now running the U.S. government.”

Harvey and Irma have at least temporarily spared climate change activists a major embarrassment. Consider the case of Chris Mooney, a hip young journalist who scored big in the literary/science complex with his 2005 book, The Republican War on Science. No sooner did the book come out than Hurricane Katrina hit and Mooney quickly exploited it in his next book, Storm World: Hurricanes, Politics, and the Battle Over Global Warming.

Even before Mooney wrote this alarmist tract, nothing started to happen. Florida went a record eleven years without a single hurricane strike before the modest Category I Matthew struck Northern Florida in October 2016. Similarly, according to the Weather Channel, the even more modest Hermine “eclipsed the longest drought on record, dating to 1886,” when it entered the Gulf of Mexico in September 2016. Before Hermine, not a single hurricane had entered or developed in the Gulf in three years.

In his 2008 book on hurricanes, Mooney was still using the term “global warming.” He was falling behind the Newspeak curve. The media was switching from “global warming” to “climate change,” and they were doing so for a reason. The semantic shift was necessary to rationalize either too many storms or too few, too much warmth or too little, too little rain or too much. Remember the “never-ending California drought?” Well, it ended last year.

This summer, Kansas City and just about every place north and east of us enjoyed near record cool weather. In the last 48 days, Kansas City has had just one day over 90 degrees. The record for September 11, by the way, is 101. Is this climate change too? Is everything?

Yes, Virgina, hurricanes hit Florida during “hurricane season.” Disney World puts out a handy guide for visitors. According to the guide, “Ninety percent of activity is from August through October; 50% between August 20th and October 10th; and the peak of the hurricane season is September 10th. Irma hit Disney World on September 10. The odds of a nine-day visit around September 10 being affected by a hurricane is about 40 percent.

Rush Limbaugh was right, and the climate change pushers are upset this morning that Irma was not as bad as predicted–or, let’s be honest–hoped.

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